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Recipe: Giant Peachtree Double IPA

Remember double IPAs before they went all soft and hazy on us? This is one of those—bright and bitter, with plenty of oomph.

Josh Weikert Sep 24, 2021 - 3 min read

Recipe: Giant Peachtree Double IPA Primary Image

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Remember double IPAs before they went all soft and hazy on us? This is one of those—bright and bitter, with plenty of oomph. Call it West Coast–style if you want, or American double IPA ... or just brew it and drink it. Here’s more on how to Make Your Best.

ALL-GRAIN

Batch size: 5 gallons (19 liters)
Brewhouse efficiency: 74%
OG: 1.076
FG: 1.019
IBUs: 67
ABV: 7.9%

MALT/GRAIN BILL
13 lb (5.9 kg) pilsner
8 oz (227 g) Weyermann Caramunich I
8 oz (227 g) British light crystal (45L)

HOPS SCHEDULE
0.5 oz (14 g) Warrior at 60 minutes [30 IBUs]
1 oz (28 g) Amarillo at 30 minutes [22 IBUs]
1 oz (28 g) each of Amarillo, Citra, and Motueka at whirlpool [15 IBUs]
1 oz (28 g) Amarillo at dry hop on Day 1
1 oz (28 g) Citra at dry hop on Day 5
1 oz (28 g) Motueka at dry hop on Day 10

YEAST
Wyeast 1007 German Ale

DIRECTIONS
Mill the grains and mash at 152°F (67°C) for 60 minutes. Vorlauf until your runnings are clear, then run off into the kettle. Sparge and top up as necessary to get about 6 gallons (23 liters) of wort—or more, depending on your evaporation rate. Boil for 60 minutes, adding hops according to the schedule. After the boil and whirlpool (if whirlpooling), chill to about 60°F (16°C). Aerate well and pitch plenty of healthy yeast. Starting on Day 1, add dry hops according to the schedule. Ferment at 62°F (17°C) for the first 2 days, then allow the temperature rise to 69°F (21°C) over the course of 8 days (until Day 10). When dry hopping is complete and the gravity has stabilized, crash to 35°F (2°C), package, and carbonate to about 2.5 volumes.

BREWER’S NOTES
The dry-hopping sequence may seem picky, but after multiple trials, the Amarillo-Citra-Motueka train produced the brightest and best aroma. (Feel free to try your own combinations, especially if swapping in other hops.) Also, take your time. Too many IPAs are rushed into package to preserve their hop character, only to produce a beer with off-flavors (such as diacetyl; see “Brewing with Hops: Don’t Be Creeped Out,” beerandbrewing.com). This is a robust recipe, and the beer will be bright and hoppy for a healthy interval.

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